Early Stage Researchers

University of Göttingen:

  • Susanne Wiedenmann works in multicriteria decision making. She investigates the supply chain of renewable resources and including the their uncertainties. She has been seconded to Christchurch and Auckland for three months from December 2010 to February 2011.
  • Jonas Ide works in multicriteria optimization, and in particular develops concepts for robustness in discrete multicriteria problems and algorithms for solving them exactly. He was seconded to Auckland for four months from October 2011 until February 2012.
  • Ruth Hübner works in nonlinear discrete optimization. She investigates rounding properties for nonlinear discrete optimization problems which are based on properties of the level sets of the corresponding objective functions.
  • Robert Schieweck works in location theory and robust statistics. He is interested in robustly locating lines in the presence of outliers with applications in latent class regression. He has been seconded to Christchurch and Auckland for three months from January to April 2013.
  • Jonas Harbering works in location theory and transportation planning. A field he is working on and which combines both optimization fields is the stop location problem.
  • Sönke Behrends investigates mixed-integer nonlinear problems. He approaches these problems with methods from applied convex algebraic geometry and ideas from continuous optimization. He has been seconded to Christchurch for two weeks in January 2015 and to Auckland for two months in February and March 2015.
  • Morten Tiedemann works in online optimization and algorithmic mechanism design. He is interested in resource allocation and distribution problems in terms of resource efficiency, and deals with uncertainties incident to these problems.
  • Sybille Dühring works in the field of multi-objective decision support. She is interested in the production planning of recycling cascades under consideration of their uncertainties. She has been seconded to Christchurch and Auckland for three months in 2013.
  • Marie Schmidt has been seconded to Auckland as an early-stage researcher for three months in 2011. She did her PhD in 2012 and now participates as an experienced researcher in the OptALI programm.
  • Marc Goerigk works in robust optimization and traffic planning. He is interested in the design of new robustness concepts and their evaluation using experiments with real-world data. He has been seconded to Auckland and Christchurch as an early-stage researcher for three months in 2012, and finished his PhD the same year. He now participates as an experienced researcher.

Technical University of Kaiserslautern:

  • Katharina Beygang works in the optimization of railway problems. She investigates combinatorial optimization challenges arising in the area of train marshalling and freight car distribution. She has been seconded to Christchurch and Auckland for three months from end of January to April 2011. In August 2011, Katharina Beygang completed her Ph.D. at the University of Kaiserslautern.
  • Christiane Zeck researches the design and analysis of efficient algorithms for multi-stage online problems and their associated offline variants. Her research also comprises the application of competitive analysis to routing and delay-management. Christiane has been seconded to Auckland for three months from mid February to May 2011. In November 2011, Christiane Zeck submitted her Ph.D. thesis.
  • Florian Seipp studies multiple objective optimization problems. Most of his work is on combinatorial problems with a network structure. Florian Seipp’s work comprises results on the structure of the pareto frontier and the efficient computation of representative systems. Florian has been seconded to Auckland from late January to April 2012.
  • Lara Turner studies combinatorial optimization problems with universal (or ordered median) objective functions. Assigning multiplicative weights to the ordered cost coefficients of a feasible solution, these generalize classical and new objective functions like sum, bottleneck or trimmed-mean objectives. Among the combinatorial optimization problems, she focuses on universal minimum matroid base problems and universal shortest path problems. In general, the goal is to derive common properties for different types of objective functions and to develop solution algorithms for special cases. Lara has been seconded to the University of Auckland from January to March 2012.
  • Bob Grün researches the complexity and algorithmic solvability of multi criteria timetabling problems. He is the main researcher responsible for the StuPlan project. Bob has been seconded to Auckland for three months from January until March 2012.
  • Philipp Heßler works on the integration of planar and network location analysis for evacuation problems. He is participating in the Decision Support System for Evacuation Logistics project at the University of Kaiserslautern. Philipp has been seconded to Auckland from January to March 2014.
  • Sabine Büttner works on online problems and in particular the dealing with disruptions and disturbances. She is also interested in concepts going beyond pure competitive analysis. She finished her PhD-thesis at the University of Kaiserslautern in December 2013 and has been seconded to Auckland in March and April 2014.

Technical University of Denmark:

  • Tor Justesen. Tor is an industrial PhD working under supervision of Jesper Larsen. Tor is developing optimization-based solution approaches for a number of key resource optimization problems for airports. Tor will be working with David Ryan in Auckland from November 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 on the gate and stand allocation problem.
  • Simon Kristiansen. Simon is an industrial PhD working under supervision of Thomas Stidsen. Simon is working on efficient solution-techniques for a number of timetabling and assignment problems related to Danish high-schools. Simon will be working with Andrew Mason in Auckland from October 2012 to March 2013.
  • Per Thorlasius. Per is an industrial PhD working under supervision of Jesper Larsen. Per is developing an optimization-based solution approach for the planning and allocation of rolling-stock to the Copenhagen commuter train system (S-tog). Per will be working with David Ryan in Auckland from December 2013 to April 2012 on a set packing based approach for the problem.
  • Simon Bull. Simon is a PhD student working under supervision of Jesper Larsen. He is part of the RobustRailS research project that develops methods and algorithms for planning and scheduling within the rail sector incorporating robustness-issues. He is currently working on a project for the Danish State Railways (DSB) on planning rolling stock in independent systems or groups as a way to prevent knock-on effects over the entire rail system. Simon will be working with Andrew Mason and Andrea Raith during December 2014 to February 2015.

The University of Auckland:

  • Lei (Oddo) Zhang. Working under the supervision of Andrew Mason and Andy Philpott, Oddo is working on developing improved ambulance redeployment algorithms. Oddo will be seconded to Denmark for several months at the end of 2011.
  • Siamak Moradi. Siamak is supervised by Matthias Ehrgott, Judith Wang and Andrea Raith. He is developing algorithms for multi-objective multicommodity flow probelms with the eventual goal of applying these methods to the traffic assignment problem.
  • Kuan-Min Lin. Kuan-Min investigates mutli-objectiev optimisation methods for the planning of intensity modulated arc therapy, a modern modality of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. His work is carried out in conjunction with Auckland Radiation Oncology and Aucklnad City Hospital under the supervision of Matthias Ehrgott and Andrea Raith.
  • Olga Perederieieva. Olga works under the supervision of Matthias Ehrgott, Judith Wang and Andrea Raith. She is investigating multi-objecetive network equilibrium problems and will develop algorithms that are capable of finding all equilibrium solutions to these problems.
  • Zhengliang (Ethan) Liu. Ethan is investigating optimization problems, where the feasible set is the non-dominated set of a multi-objective optimization problem. These problems form the theoretical models of decision making problems, where the function to be optimised models a decision makers (subjective) preferences and the multi-objective optimisation problem describes the underlying choice set and the criteria according to which they are evaluated. Ethan is supervised by Matthias Ehrgott and Andrea Raith.
  • Antony Phillips. Antony’s work is concerned with university timetabling and room allocation problems. He develops new solution approaches which are based on the idea of modifying existing timetables in small, well-defined neighbourhoods, for which the resulting optimisation problems can be solved quickly. He works under supervision of David Ryan and Matthias Ehrgott.
  • Guillermo Cabrera. Guillermo works under the supervision of Andrew Mason, Matthias Ehrgott and Andrea Raith. He is developing algorithms that combine heuristic methods and mathematical programming. These algorithms will be applied on complex multiobjective problems arising in radiation therapy.
  • Lin Chen. Lin attempts to find a proper multi-objective optimisation technique to solve practical decision making problems so that helps decision making of Infrastructure. She studied many multi-objective optimisation techniques, including both exact and heuristic methods, and tested them with practical decision making in Infrastructure Asset Management. Lin will develop an algorithm to identify all efficient solutions and the communication tools to explain the results to decision makers. Lin is supervised by Theuns Henning, Andrea Raith and Asaad Shamseldin.
  • Oscar Dowson. Oscar is supervised by Andy Philpott, Andrew Mason and Anthony Downward. He is working on optimisation models for the New Zealand dairy industry in order to increase both profitability and environmental sustainability.
  • Isaac Hamling. Isaac is supervised by Michael O’Sullivan and Cameron Walker. He is working on optimisation models for cloud gaming relating to scheduling and allocation of customers in a cloud based internet cafe.
  • Samuel Ridler. Samuel is developing algorithms for ambulance redeployment and efficient staff rostering for emergency medical services, under the supervision of Andrew Mason and Andrea Raith.

University of Canterbury:

  • Mohammed Thaher. Mohammed’s research focuses on the Maximum Convex Sum Problem (MCSP), investigating design and analysis of efficient algorithms for MCSP. MCSP is an important topic – this combines theoretical algorithm framework and real-world data. MCSP is a challenging study area, which seeks finding novel approaches to resolve the problem of finding a region that returns an optimized maximum sum using minimized computing time. Mohammed’s thesis is supervised by Professor Tadao Takaoka.
  • Tong-Wook Shinn. Tong is a PhD student supervised by Prof. Takaoka, whose research focus is on a new graph path problem called the Shortest Paths for All Flows (SP-AF) problem that effectively combines the shortest paths and bottleneck paths problems into one. This new problem is similar to the bi-objective shortest paths problem and has practical applications in any network where there are varying flow amounts and path costs. Matrix multiplication is used as a tool for providing efficient algorithms to this new problem. Tong is also doing research in parallel algorithms.
  • Timm Treskatis. In his PhD project, Timm develops a novel analytical and numerical approach to model and simulate flows of viscoplastic fluids. The underlying constrained minimisation problem, which is posed in function spaces, is effectively solved with suitably adapted algorithms from the class of trust-region SQP methods. Viscoplastic flow problems have a vast range of applications in many industries, including consumer goods, petroleum and disaster management. The PhD project is supervised by Miguel Moyers-González and Chris Price.